Quill and Quire

Fiction: Novels

By Kerry Claire

The term “Internet celebrity” means something very different today than it did two decades ago. Before the advent of social media, the designation was reserved for a few brave bloggers who laid their deepest secrets ... Read More »

March 16, 2017 | Filed under: Fiction: Novels

By Emma Richler

In her latest novel, Emma Richler comes across as an unapologetic maximalist. If minimalism presupposes that less is more, Richler’s aesthetic in this exuberant, freewheeling work is the precise opposite. At the heart of Be ... Read More »

March 16, 2017 | Filed under: Fiction: Novels

By David Carpenter

Canadian history is inextricably connected to geography. And Canadian fiction seems endlessly absorbed with a reckoning between the land and the humans who exploit it. Saskatchewan’s David Carpenter has staked out one indelible corner of ... Read More »

March 9, 2017 | Filed under: Fiction: Novels

By Jean McNeil

“Everywhere we go broadcasts a message, a current of meaning,” observes Rebecca Laurelson, the protagonist of Jean McNeil’s tense and atmospheric new novel, The Dhow House. “Here,” she continues, “it has something to do with ... Read More »

March 6, 2017 | Filed under: Fiction: Novels

By Rachel Cusk

Canadian-born, U.K.-based Rachel Cusk, author of eight previous novels and three memoirs, has become one of our most astute writers, gaining steady recognition and a couple of literary prizes along the way. Her latest book is ... Read More »

March 1, 2017 | Filed under: Fiction: Novels

By Anna Pitoniak

Random House editor Anna Pitoniak, born in Whistler but now based in New York, makes a strong literary debut with The Futures, a novel that follows a young couple in their 20s as they take ... Read More »

February 22, 2017 | Filed under: Fiction: Novels

By Elan Mastai

The premise of screenwriter Elan Mastai’s All Our Wrong Todays is almost perversely appropriate for our present moment. The year is 2016. Narrator Tom Barren has grown up as a shiftless underachiever in a Jetsons-inspired ... Read More »

February 9, 2017 | Filed under: Fiction: Novels

By Anton Piatigorsky

American history is largely a construction of the U.S. Supreme Court. Patriots loudly bray about democracy and the Constitution, but realists understand that the unelected judiciary is charged with interpreting the law of the land, ... Read More »

January 30, 2017 | Filed under: Fiction: Novels

By Lesley Krueger

Lesley Krueger’s Mad Richard opens in Bedlam. Also known as the Bethlem Royal Hospital for the mentally ill, it houses artist Richard Dadd, who we learn in the book’s first paragraph is a murderer. A ... Read More »

January 24, 2017 | Filed under: Fiction: Novels

By Jesse Ruddock

Tristan is always alone. Sure, there are people around him, names and voices that float in and out of Jesse Ruddock’s debut novel. These characters bounce questions and attempts at intimacy off of Tristan’s young, ... Read More »

January 9, 2017 | Filed under: Fiction: Novels

By Eva Stachniak

Many works of fiction take as their inspiration true events and persons of historical significance, but few do so as lovingly and imaginatively as Eva Stachniak’s fifth novel. The Chosen Maiden is a fictionalized account ... Read More »

January 3, 2017 | Filed under: Fiction: Novels

By Ed O’Loughlin

When the wrecks of the expeditionary ships HMS Erebus and Terror, lost while searching for the Northwest Passage in the mid–19th century, were finally discovered (in 2014 and 2016, respectively), the events marked the final ... Read More »

January 3, 2017 | Filed under: Fiction: Novels

By Emily Saso

Indoors or out, actual or perceived, the weather in Emily Saso’s assured debut novel tends toward the weird and tumultuous. Set in a contemporary but unappealing Toronto – “a place bloated with condo developments and ... Read More »

December 21, 2016 | Filed under: Fiction: Novels

By David Montrose

The term “Canadian noir” sounds almost oxymoronic – as a concept, it runs contrary to both our complacently benign self-image and our international reputation as wholesome, apologetic, and frostbitten. The strange difficulty of convincing ourselves ... Read More »

December 15, 2016 | Filed under: Fiction: Novels

By Margaret Atwood

Any act of artistic performance shares a close affinity with magic. Stephen King has made this connection in numerous essays, forewords, and introductions to his own work, and in his recent memoir, Bruce Springsteen refers ... Read More »

December 12, 2016 | Filed under: Fiction: Novels

By Mary Frances Coady

With Holy Rule, Mary Frances Coady revisits the cloistered Catholic world she explored in her 2009 short-story collection, The Practice of Perfection. Those stories followed a group of novitiates taking their first steps toward becoming ... Read More »

December 12, 2016 | Filed under: Fiction: Novels