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Cold blood country: Debra Komar

Cold blood country: Debra Komar
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In the early years of the Canadian experiment, a brutal murder was committed in rural New Brunswick. The victim was a young woman named Mercy Hall, whose mentally disturbed brother was later sentenced to hang for his role in her horrific death.<br /> <br /> More than 200 years later, <b>Debra Komar</b> – a leader in the field of forensic anthropology – revisits the sensational case in the true-crime tale <i>The Ballad of Jacob Peck</i> (Goose Lane Editions, $19.95 pa., March). The aim of the book is not to prove the guilt or innocence of the accused, but rather to examine how an itinerant preacher named Jacob Peck may have fomented the crime via his incendiary sermons. The resulting book promises to be a unique account of life on the Canadian frontier, and a gripping tale of how isolation and religious fervour led to this dark episode buried deep in our history. <i>–Stuart Woods</i><br /> <br /> (Illustration: <a href="http://kaganmcleod.com/">Kagan McLeod</a>)
Cold blood country: Debra Komar
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In the early years of the Canadian experiment, a brutal murder was committed in rural New Brunswick. The victim was a young woman named Mercy Hall, whose mentally disturbed brother was later sentenced to hang for his role in her horrific death.

More than 200 years later, Debra Komar – a leader in the field of forensic anthropology – revisits the sensational case in the true-crime tale The Ballad of Jacob Peck (Goose Lane Editions, $19.95 pa., March). The aim of the book is not to prove the guilt or innocence of the accused, but rather to examine how an itinerant preacher named Jacob Peck may have fomented the crime via his incendiary sermons. The resulting book promises to be a unique account of life on the Canadian frontier, and a gripping tale of how isolation and religious fervour led to this dark episode buried deep in our history. –Stuart Woods

(Illustration: Kagan McLeod)