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Burma Rivers of Flavor by Naomi Duguid; Richard Jung, photog. (Random House Canada)

Burma Rivers of Flavor by Naomi Duguid; Richard Jung, photog. (Random House Canada)
0
In a publishing category dominated by TV chefs and trend-inspired tomes, Naomi Duguid has developed an avid following for her lavish, travel-based cookbooks. The secret to Duguid's success lies in her ability to render intimidating foreign cuisines and cultures accessible: the books are as beautiful as they are useful in the kitchen. Even non-cooks will be awed by the gorgeous photography and informative travelogue entries, which impart as much about the food as a region's history and its people.<br /> <p> Duguid's previous titles, including the James Beard Cookbook of the Year Award“winning <i>Flatbreads and Flavors: A Baker's Atlas</i> and <i>Hot Sour Salty Sweet</i>, were imposing coffee-table books co-authored by her ex-partner, Jeffrey Alford. In Burma: Rivers of Flavor, Duguid proves she's as capable of producing a stellar cookbook on her own, imbuing the text with insight, thorough research, and obvious affection for the country. The recipes are surprisingly simple, the ingredients increasingly easy to find. A smaller format and accessible price point should also attract new readers, who may have been afraid to sully the earlier books' glossy pages with a smear of chili sauce.<br /> <br /> <a href="http://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/0307362167/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=15121&creative=330641&creativeASIN=0307362167&linkCode=as2&tag=quillquire-20">Buy this book</a><img src="http://www.assoc-amazon.ca/e/ir?t=quillquire-20&l=as2&o=15&a=0307362167" width="1" height="1" border="0" alt="" style="border:none !important;margin:0px !important" /><br /> </p>
Burma Rivers of Flavor by Naomi Duguid; Richard Jung, photog. (Random House Canada)
http://www.quillandquire.com/wp-content/uploads/burma-90x90.jpg
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{"credit":"Picasa","created_timestamp":1350052479}
burma

In a publishing category dominated by TV chefs and trend-inspired tomes, Naomi Duguid has developed an avid following for her lavish, travel-based cookbooks. The secret to Duguid’s success lies in her ability to render intimidating foreign cuisines and cultures accessible: the books are as beautiful as they are useful in the kitchen. Even non-cooks will be awed by the gorgeous photography and informative travelogue entries, which impart as much about the food as a region’s history and its people.

Duguid’s previous titles, including the James Beard Cookbook of the Year Award“winning Flatbreads and Flavors: A Baker’s Atlas and Hot Sour Salty Sweet, were imposing coffee-table books co-authored by her ex-partner, Jeffrey Alford. In Burma: Rivers of Flavor, Duguid proves she’s as capable of producing a stellar cookbook on her own, imbuing the text with insight, thorough research, and obvious affection for the country. The recipes are surprisingly simple, the ingredients increasingly easy to find. A smaller format and accessible price point should also attract new readers, who may have been afraid to sully the earlier books’ glossy pages with a smear of chili sauce.

Buy this book

« Back to
Quillblog

Burma Rivers of Flavor by Naomi Duguid; Richard Jung, photog. (Random House Canada)

Burma Rivers of Flavor by Naomi Duguid; Richard Jung, photog. (Random House Canada)
0
In a publishing category dominated by TV chefs and trend-inspired tomes, Naomi Duguid has developed an avid following for her lavish, travel-based cookbooks. The secret to Duguid’s success lies in her ability to render intimidating foreign cuisines and cultures accessible: the books are as beautiful as they are useful in the kitchen. Even non-cooks will be awed by the gorgeous photography and informative travelogue entries, which impart as much about the food as a region’s history and its people.<br /> <p> Duguid’s previous titles, including the James Beard Cookbook of the Year Award–winning <i>Flatbreads and Flavors: A Baker’s Atlas</i> and <i>Hot Sour Salty Sweet</i>, were imposing coffee-table books co-authored by her ex-partner, Jeffrey Alford. In Burma: Rivers of Flavor, Duguid proves she’s as capable of producing a stellar cookbook on her own, imbuing the text with insight, thorough research, and obvious affection for the country. The recipes are surprisingly simple, the ingredients increasingly easy to find. A smaller format and accessible price point should also attract new readers, who may have been afraid to sully the earlier books’ glossy pages with a smear of chili sauce.<br /> <br /> <a href="http://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/0307362167/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=15121&creative=330641&creativeASIN=0307362167&linkCode=as2&tag=quillquire-20">Buy this book</a><img src="http://www.assoc-amazon.ca/e/ir?t=quillquire-20&l=as2&o=15&a=0307362167" width="1" height="1" border="0" alt="" style="border:none !important;margin:0px !important" /><br /> </p>
Burma Rivers of Flavor by Naomi Duguid; Richard Jung, photog. (Random House Canada)
http://www.quillandquire.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/burma-150x150.jpg
http://www.quillandquire.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/burma.jpg
http://www.quillandquire.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/burma.jpg
388
500
{"credit":"Picasa","created_timestamp":1350052479}
burma

In a publishing category dominated by TV chefs and trend-inspired tomes, Naomi Duguid has developed an avid following for her lavish, travel-based cookbooks. The secret to Duguid’s success lies in her ability to render intimidating foreign cuisines and cultures accessible: the books are as beautiful as they are useful in the kitchen. Even non-cooks will be awed by the gorgeous photography and informative travelogue entries, which impart as much about the food as a region’s history and its people.

Duguid’s previous titles, including the James Beard Cookbook of the Year Award–winning Flatbreads and Flavors: A Baker’s Atlas and Hot Sour Salty Sweet, were imposing coffee-table books co-authored by her ex-partner, Jeffrey Alford. In Burma: Rivers of Flavor, Duguid proves she’s as capable of producing a stellar cookbook on her own, imbuing the text with insight, thorough research, and obvious affection for the country. The recipes are surprisingly simple, the ingredients increasingly easy to find. A smaller format and accessible price point should also attract new readers, who may have been afraid to sully the earlier books’ glossy pages with a smear of chili sauce.

Buy this book