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Savage Love by Douglas Glover (Goose Lane Editions)

Savage Love by Douglas Glover (Goose Lane Editions)
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Certain mysteries abide in this world: the Gordian Knot, the Holy Trinity, and the literary obscurity of Douglas Glover. Over the course of a career spanning three and a half decades, Glover has produced some of the most stylish, adventurous fiction this country has ever seen, and yet he seems to be continually passed over for recognition (a 2003 Governor General's Literary Award for his historical novel <i>Elle</i> notwithstanding). The reason for this oversight is frankly inexplicable, outside of a general nervousness when confronted with technically brilliant fiction. <br /> <p>The stories in <i>Savage Love</i> are vintage Glover: running from five lines to more than 50 pages, and spanning historical periods from the 19th century to the present, each one is a pristine example of the short form. Glover's sentences pulse and breathe, seethe and spit; his stories avoid prefab emotion in favour of bracing, often brutal honesty. For the courageous, there was no better collection of stories published this year.</p>
<A HREF="http://www.quillandquire.com/reviews/review.cfm?review_id=8168">Savage Love by Douglas Glover (Goose Lane Editions)</A>
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savagelove

Certain mysteries abide in this world: the Gordian Knot, the Holy Trinity, and the literary obscurity of Douglas Glover. Over the course of a career spanning three and a half decades, Glover has produced some of the most stylish, adventurous fiction this country has ever seen, and yet he seems to be continually passed over for recognition (a 2003 Governor General’s Literary Award for his historical novel Elle notwithstanding). The reason for this oversight is frankly inexplicable, outside of a general nervousness when confronted with technically brilliant fiction.

The stories in Savage Love are vintage Glover: running from five lines to more than 50 pages, and spanning historical periods from the 19th century to the present, each one is a pristine example of the short form. Glover’s sentences pulse and breathe, seethe and spit; his stories avoid prefab emotion in favour of bracing, often brutal honesty. For the courageous, there was no better collection of stories published this year.

« Back to
Quillblog

Savage Love by Douglas Glover (Goose Lane Editions)

Savage Love by Douglas Glover (Goose Lane Editions)
0
Certain mysteries abide in this world: the Gordian Knot, the Holy Trinity, and the literary obscurity of Douglas Glover. Over the course of a career spanning three and a half decades, Glover has produced some of the most stylish, adventurous fiction this country has ever seen, and yet he seems to be continually passed over for recognition (a 2003 Governor General's Literary Award for his historical novel <i>Elle</i> notwithstanding). The reason for this oversight is frankly inexplicable, outside of a general nervousness when confronted with technically brilliant fiction. <br /> <p>The stories in <i>Savage Love</i> are vintage Glover: running from five lines to more than 50 pages, and spanning historical periods from the 19th century to the present, each one is a pristine example of the short form. Glover's sentences pulse and breathe, seethe and spit; his stories avoid prefab emotion in favour of bracing, often brutal honesty. For the courageous, there was no better collection of stories published this year.</p>
<A HREF="http://www.quillandquire.com/reviews/review.cfm?review_id=8168">Savage Love by Douglas Glover (Goose Lane Editions)</A>
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savagelove

Certain mysteries abide in this world: the Gordian Knot, the Holy Trinity, and the literary obscurity of Douglas Glover. Over the course of a career spanning three and a half decades, Glover has produced some of the most stylish, adventurous fiction this country has ever seen, and yet he seems to be continually passed over for recognition (a 2003 Governor General’s Literary Award for his historical novel Elle notwithstanding). The reason for this oversight is frankly inexplicable, outside of a general nervousness when confronted with technically brilliant fiction.

The stories in Savage Love are vintage Glover: running from five lines to more than 50 pages, and spanning historical periods from the 19th century to the present, each one is a pristine example of the short form. Glover’s sentences pulse and breathe, seethe and spit; his stories avoid prefab emotion in favour of bracing, often brutal honesty. For the courageous, there was no better collection of stories published this year.